Celebrating 5 Years
Positive Reviews

King John

Tom Patterson Theatre May 21 to September 20 More Info

Carroll’s show superb

Positive Review
The Chicago Tribune Chris Jones

This pro­duc­tion has a remark­able inti­macy, crys­tal­lized by the for­mi­da­ble actor Gra­ham Abbey, whose rela­tion­ship with the audi­ence becomes one of the clos­est I’ve ever seen in a Shake­spearean drama, even though Abbey is play­ing a char­ac­ter named Philip the Bastard.”

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Unremarkable production

Mixed Review
The Slotkin Letter Lynn Slotkin

[Seana McKenna] brings her own grace and regal bear­ing to the role. And when mat­ters turn ugly for Arthur, McKenna is heartbreaking.…Good act­ing in a rather unre­mark­able pro­duc­tion except for the sug­ges­tion it’s all lit by can­dle light.”

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Stratford makes the best of an uneven play

Positive Review
The National Post Robert Cushman

The Strat­ford Festival’s King John is a very good pro­duc­tion of a play about a very bad king. Tom McCa­mus plays him, riv­et­ingly, as a neu­rotic nar­cis­sist who, unlike his fel­low Shake­spearean tyrant Richard III, makes the fatal mis­take of car­ing whether peo­ple like him.”

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McCamus’s King John a dangerous man

Mixed Review
The Slotkin Letter Lynn Slotkin

His speech is almost sing-songy that lulls you into think­ing this man is a light­weight intel­lec­tu­ally. He isn’t. When he declares war it is qui­etly and with a lethal smile. There is no doubt this is a dan­ger­ous man.

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McCamus a joy to watch

Positive Review
Capital Critics circle Jamie Portman

I’m not sure whether it’s cor­rect to say that McCa­mus is a source of end­less delight in the pro­duc­tion that opened Wednes­day. But it’s cer­tainly accu­rate to say that you can’t take your eyes off him from the moment he first sham­bles onto the stage of the Tom Pat­ter­son Theatre…”

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Deliciously contemporary

2 ½ out of 4 Stars
Positive Review
Globe and Mail J. Kelly Nestruck

a very cyn­i­cal play about politics.…[Carroll is] pre­sent­ing King John as if it were at the inti­mate, indoors Black­fri­ars The­atre in Stratford’s inti­mate, indoors Tom Pat­ter­son Theatre…I had enough fun play­ing Carroll’s game this time around to see this King John as half-full, rather than half-empty.”

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Refreshing to see one of Shakespeare’s more obscure offerings

Positive Review
The London Free Press Laura Cudworth

The play is stacked with a heavy­weight ensem­ble cast but the night really belonged to Abbey. It was arguably his best per­for­mance. He’s never looked more comfortable…McKenna and Collins…are well-matched adver­saries and such fun to watch.”

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Caroll’s interest lies in the history of English theatre

Negative Review
The Record Robert Reid

If audi­ences don’t feel trans­ported to the 16th cen­tury, the encroach­ing dark­ness, illu­mi­nated by can­dles (hats off to light­ing desig ner Kevin Fraser), cer­tainly reflects the increas­ing the­matic dark­ness of a play…Despite the intrin­sic strength of the cast, when all is said, they col­lec­tively can­not lift the pro­duc­tion higher than …

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Uneven, medieval House of Cards

2 ½ out of 4 Stars
Mixed Review
The Toronto Star Richard Ouzounian

the action is riv­et­ing, the polit­i­cal machi­na­tions deli­cious and all the per­form­ers, royal or oth­er­wise, take great delight in the parts they’re playing.…a truly elec­tric first half — and a sec­ond that is drenched in can­dle­light, in every sense of the word.”

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