Celebrating 5 Years
Positive Reviews

Hay Fever

Avon Theatre May 28 to October 11 More Info

Echoes of Chekov & roots of Who’s Afraid Of Virginia Woolf

Positive Review
TO Poet Duncan T. Armstrong

Through­out the play I felt echoes of Chekov’s tragic fam­i­lies, where the dis­func­tion usu­ally leads to unhap­pi­ness… I also saw in this the roots of Who’s Afraid Of Vir­ginia Woolf: a fam­ily who plays emo­tional games with each other, invites guests into the games – in Hay Fever the guest …

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I found myself booking tickets to see Hay Fever again

Positive Review
Robyn's Reviews Robyn Godfrey

It strikes me as I review my notes that by pre­sent­ing Hay Fever along with Crazy for You and Man of La Man­cha, the Strat­ford Fes­ti­val declared an unin­ten­tional theme in their sea­son — a love for, and the trans­for­ma­tive power of the­atre.… No won­der why, despite it falling short …

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Peacock hilarious, ridiculous and fun to watch

Positive Review
Broadway World Lauren Gienow

Ms. Pea­cock com­mands the stage. Her Judith is both hilar­i­ous and ridicu­lous and she is so much fun to watch…a delight­ful com­edy from start to fin­ish. It empha­sizes the absurd, but not to the point where audi­ences can­not relate.”

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A disconnected set of performances

Negative Review
The National Post Robert Cushman

Pea­cock, tech­ni­cally expert, cov­ers all Judith’s self-indulgent bases with­out quite tak­ing pos­ses­sion of them — or, per­haps, let­ting them pos­sess her; her nat­ural qual­ity is earthy rather than flighty…Gareth Pot­ter is splen­did as the young boxer who finds him­self going sep­a­rate rounds with each of the ladies of the house”

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Approaching Seinfeld

Mixed Review
The American Conservative Noah Millman

Cow­ard isn’t engaged in social satire, because satire requires an affir­ma­tive set of val­ues against which a soci­ety may be judged. Hay Fever has no such val­ues – it’s bliss­fully rel­a­tivis­tic. Instead of val­ues, it has man­ners. But nobody agrees what those man­ners ought to be – and it is …

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Frenetically funny

4 ½ out of 5 Stars
Positive Review
Donald's Dish Geoff Dale

Dale does won­ders with her meaty role, cast in a part that does not sim­ply require glam­our and a lot of pos­tur­ing. No longer the play’s naïve flirty ingénue, she sinks her teeth into the char­ac­ter, shoot­ing out wit­ti­cisms and wise cracks at a rapid-fire place.”

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Satire about artistic pretension

Negative Review
The Record Robert Reid

Cow­ard is funniest—and truest—when he is played straight. Gareth Pot­ter as the horny boxer Sandy, San­jay Tal­war as the Jon Lovitz-inspired diplo­mat Richard and Cyn­thia Dale as the socialite Myra have evanes­cent moments of tepid lev­ity, but col­lec­tively it’s not enough to lift the pro­duc­tion beyond mediocrity.”

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When everyone is acting, is anything real?

2 ½ out of 4 Stars
Positive Review
The Globe and Mail J. Kelly Nestruck

There’s a hol­low­ness to this Hay Fever…I’m divided, how­ever, as to whether this is a fault of Palmer’s pro­duc­tion, or if Palmer’s pro­duc­tion is sim­ply show­ing us the hol­low­ness of Coward’s world and, more fright­en­ingly, our own.”

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Laughs spread a bit thin here

Negative Review
The Stratford Beacon Herald Laura Cudworth

It’s too bad but the laugh­ter is spread a bit thin here. That’s not to say there are no laughs. There are. And some of them are hardy. Many of those laughs come from Pea­cock as the eter­nally dra­matic actress for whom the rest of the fam­ily must “play up.”

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The director did it

2 out of 4 Stars
Mixed Review
The Toronto Star Richard Ouzounian

” Gareth Pot­ter totally con­vinc­ing as the dense but horny jock, Ijeoma Eme­sowum sweetly vapid as the over-her-head flappe…not a bad night in the the­atre, but it’s not a ter­ri­bly good one, either. And if you’re look­ing for the vil­lain, it’s not the but­ler. The direc­tor did it.”

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